Today is World Veterinary Day!

Logo taken from AVMA to visit their website click on the logo

Logo taken from AVMA to visit their website click on the logo

FROM AVMA:

On April 27, World Veterinary Day 2013 will seek to raise awareness of vaccination as a means to prevent disease.

The World Veterinary Association created World Veterinary Day in 2000 as an annual celebration of the veterinary profession, falling on the last Saturday of April. Each year, the WVA and World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) choose a theme for the event.

“Vaccination of animals helps people to protect their livestock and their companion animals, as well as themselves in case of zoonotic diseases,” according to an online announcement for World Veterinary Day 2013. “Through well organised campaigns, vaccination contributes to the eradication of diseases from certain areas and even from the world.”

According to the announcement, the veterinary profession is crucial to the success of vaccination in protecting animal health.

 

I don't mind visiting my vet (THAT MUCH!) He keeps me healthy!

I don’t mind visiting my vet (THAT MUCH!) He keeps me healthy!

Mom and I were looking around the Internet because we wanted to share info with you about what vaccines your puppies and dogs should have, and here is what we found from WebMD:

How Important Are Vaccines to the Health of My Dog?

Bottom line-vaccines are very important in managing the health of your dog. That said, not every dog needs to be vaccinated against every disease. It is very important to discuss with your veterinarian a vaccination protocol that’s right for your dog. Factors that should be examined include age, medical history, environment, travel habits and lifestyle. Most vets highly recommend administering core vaccines to healthy dogs.

What Are Core Vaccines?

In 2006, the American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Task Force published a revised version of guidelines regarding canine vaccinations. The guidelines divide vaccines into three categories-core, non-core and not recommended.

  • Core vaccines are considered vital to all dogs based on risk of exposure, severity of disease or transmissibility to humans. Canine parvovirusdistemper, canine hepatitis and rabies are considered core vaccines by the Task Force.
  • Non-core vaccines are given depending on the dog’s exposure risk. These include vaccines against Bordetella bronchiseptica, Borrelia burgdorferi and Leptospira bacteria. 

 

My Mom makes sure I am up-t0-date on all of my vaccines because they are super important! They don’t really even hurt that much do they? What do you think?

Barks and licks and love, 

Dakota